Lobby group Drive Change has called on the industry’s two main bodies – the Australian Medicinal Cannabis Association (AMCA) and Medicinal Cannabis Industry Australia (MCIA) – to unite behind its campaign to reform drug-driving laws.

Under current Australia-wide laws, drivers with any amount of THC in their system – however small – can be prosecuted even if there is no evidence to suggest their driving is impaired.

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Former magistrate David Heilpern and cannabis education website Honahlee co-founder Tom Brown presented to the AMCA board last night, while a meeting with MCIA is scheduled for tonight (Wednesday).

Writing on the Drive Change website, campaign coordinator Bee Mohamed said: “Drive Change is an opportunity for the industry to unite with one message and to join others in being a voice for patients, Australia-wide.

Drive Change campaign coordinator Bee Mohamed has called on the industry to do more to support the campaign

“[It] is an excellent opportunity for a coordinated and collaborative campaign that brings industry bodies such as AMCA, MCIA, patients and political figures together.”

Drive Change is a non-profit organisation that has so far raised around A$11,500 to fund the campaign to change the current laws for patients. Harm Reduction Australia provided a startup fund of $5,000, with patients contributing around $1500.

However, Mohamed noted: “In an industry of more than 100 companies, only five have donated for a total of approximately $5,000. It is our hope that all companies will support and donate to this important campaign for patients.”

The campaigners have asked the AMCA board to help raise $35,000 from its members to fund the campaign. It will ask for the same contribution from MCIA.